Could the Ashley Madison Hack Have Been Prevented With the Blockchain?

Could the Ashley Madison Hack Have Been Prevented With the Blockchain?

Security is an increasing concern among internet-based companies. The latest Ashley Madison hack is one example of how companies are exposed to security issues and how their users can be profoundly affected. The internet of today is far from safe, and security has come to be the main concern for companies operating on the web. So far, only one network has proven itself to be totally impervious to intrusion with today’s technology: the blockchain. The Bitcoin network uses thousands of devices connected worldwide, which automatically outruns any attack made by hackers. It offers a level of....


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Quotes

If it gets very popular, I can see the government clamping down. I think it would lead to a massive drop off in the number of users.

Alistair Cotton, Senior analyst with Currencies Direct