Rebutting the NY Post’s Lazy Criticisms of Bitcoin

Rebutting the NY Post’s Lazy Criticisms of Bitcoin

On Thursday, New York Post columnist John Crudele published a patronizing critique of the MIT Bitcoin project, an initiative announced last spring that will see every undergraduate at MIT receive about US$100 worth of bitcoins this fall. Crudele’s main problem with this project is that he feels MIT is being irresponsible in letting students mess around with money he feels has questionable value. Crudele’s argument is dripping with scorn and riddled with logical fallacies. In the near future, the leaders of Massachusetts Institute of Technology will have to decide whether they want to take....


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Scott Rose is a professional actor, host, writer, and comedy improviser living in Austin, Texas, and was one of the top professional speakers for Apple Computer at its events nationwide for six years. He is the creator of the viral hit video series Shit Apple Fanatics Say. He recently released his video series Shit Bitcoin Fanatics Say. Follow him on Twitter @scotty321. The mainstream media often overlooks all the amazing and positive developments that are happening in the bitcoin world, as well as the incredibly innovative and supportive community that is building around bitcoin. To....

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As the country continue to struggle, consumers and enterprises will turn towards alternative finance. Other than crowdfunding and peer-to-peer lending, cryptocurrency is gaining traction in that segment. If there were ever a chance of Bitcoin having the opportunity to gain traction in the UK, now would be that time. A trade minister who voted in favor of the Brexit says local business are ‘lazy and fat”. Not the nicest of comments, but also a sign things will need to change sooner rather than later. This could be good news for cryptocurrency, albeit the thoughts of one....

Quotes

For much of history since its beginning in ancient Egypt, the essence of cryptography—which takes its name from the Greek words for “hidden” and “writing”—lay in encoding language to keep a message secret.

Paul Vigna, The Age of Cryptocurrency