CoinDesk Investigates: Can Divorcees Hide Assets in Bitcoins?

CoinDesk Investigates: Can Divorcees Hide Assets in Bitcoins?

Could a divorcee hide their assets by squirrelling them away in bitcoin? A rogue poster on the Bitcoin Talk Forum raised the issue this week, so CoinDesk asked some lawyers. According to the user on Bitcoin Talk, a man discovered that his wife cheated on him and decided to divorce her. However, before he did, he spent several weeks moving a large percentage of his assets into bitcoins, in an attempt to shield the assets. The post continues, saying: "He just sprung the divorce on his ex-wife and now her lawyer is arguing he must have much more money than he claims to be. The judge ordered....


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Quotes

I really like Bitcoin. I own Bitcoins. It's a store of value, a distributed ledger. It's a great place to put assets, especially in places like Argentina with 40 percent inflation, where $1 today is worth 60 cents in a year, and a government's currency does not hold value. It's also a good investment vehicle if you have an appetite for risk. But it won't be a currency until volatility slows down.

David Marcus, Former President of PayPal