Bitcoin Marketplace Buttercoin Folds Despite $2.1 Million Investment

Bitcoin Marketplace Buttercoin Folds Despite $2.1 Million Investment

Comment added from Buttercoin founder and CEO Cedric Dahl. UPDATE (6th April 14:03 BST): Comment added from Garrick Hileman, an economic historian at the London School of Economics. US bitcoin marketplace Buttercoin is shutting its doors, despite launching with $2.1m in investor backing just four months ago. In a farewell post to customers today, the Buttercoin team announced the service will go offline this Friday (April 10th) at 11pm PST. Stressing that it was "100% secure and solvent", the Palo Alto-based platform blamed a lack of VC interest for its closure, stating: "With the dip in....


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Quotes

We've been a strong supporter of Bitcoin for a number of years as it allows overseas transactions with less fees and exchange rate fluctuations.

David Brim, CEO Tomcar Australia