How The Blockchain Is Changing The Music Business

How The Blockchain Is Changing The Music Business

The blockchain is allowing musicians to monetize their work and engage with fans more directly, according to a recent CNN news report by Edith Suarez. By embedding music in the blockchain, those involved in its creation can get paid immediately in cryptocurrency. Hence, the blockchain has the potential to change the way the music industry operates. The report highlights Grammy-winning artist Imogen Heap, one of the most visible musician advocates of the blockchain. How It Works. “Music is placed in the decentralized server, then each song is embedded with a piece of code, meaning that in....


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Quotes

BitCoin is actually an exploit against network complexity. Not financial networks, or computer networks, or social networks. Networks themselves.

Dan Kaminsky, American security researcher