Norway Authorities Nab 15 Drug Dealers In Silk Road ‘2.0’ Operation

Norway Authorities Nab 15 Drug Dealers In Silk Road ‘2.0’ Operation

Norway police made their largest drug bust ever last month when they arrested 15 people selling drugs on what they claim is the second version of the notorious Silk Road online marketplace that the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation closed in 2013, according to the The Local Europe AB, a Swedish news source. Kripos, Norway’s National Criminal Investigation Service, launched Operation Marco Polo, the nation’s largest operation against organized drug crime, on the dark web. Verdens Gang, an Oslo, Norway newspaper reported this week that the sting resulted in the arrested of 15 people,....


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