The Adventures of Random Darknet Shopper

The Adventures of Random Darknet Shopper

There is one thing that we never manage to get it right. Any guesses? Yes, it is the grocery list! No matter how careful you are, you usually forget to buy one thing or another (I wonder why people always forget to buy milk). Imagine how easy life will be if you could automate your shopping with a bot. However, that's what got these guys into trouble. As a part of an exhibition, Mediengruppe Bitnik - An art group created a shopping bot called Random Darknet Shopper. True to its name, Random Darknet Shopper randomly bought stuff off the deep web by paying in Bitcoins. The bot was programmed....


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The Random Darknet Shopper is back! Random Darknet Shopper was an infamous shopping bot that scoured the deep web and purchased merchandise at random. Developed by an art group known as Mediengruppe Bitnik, the bot made its appearance in the deep web last year before running into trouble with law enforcement authorities in Switzerland. All purchases made by Random Darknet Shopper are made part of Mediengruppe Bitnik's exhibition. The articles that were on display last year at the exhibition held in Kunst Halle St. Gallen were composed of a diverse variety of merchandise including ecstasy....

Darknet Shopper Bot Back In Business: Who Is Culpable For Illegal Purchases?

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Random Darknet Shopper: Crawling The Deep Web For Art

There’s a web crawling bot combing the Dark Net Markets (DNM) buying random goods since 2014. With a weekly budget of USD $100 in Bitcoins loaded into this machine it may sound like something out of a science fiction novel. However, “Random Darknet Shopper” (RDS) is very real. RDS— the laptop that runs constantly was started by an artist collective called Mediengruppe Bitnik and is a “live art project” collecting goods from illicit online markets. The bot RDS has just recently purchased a counterfeit Polo shirt from the DNM Alpha Bay says its official owners a group called Mediengruppe....

Quotes

If it gets very popular, I can see the government clamping down. I think it would lead to a massive drop off in the number of users.

Alistair Cotton, Senior analyst with Currencies Direct