Blockchain-Based Music Sharing Platform Aims At Putting Musicians At Helm, Announces Token Sale

Blockchain-Based Music Sharing Platform Aims At Putting Musicians At Helm, Announces Token Sale

Blockchain technology continues to find inroads into different areas of business and society, especially through the token crowdsale model. The latest company to announce a token sale is Musiconomi (MCI), the Blockchain-based music ecosystem. Musiconomi is the second startup to pass through the cofound.it system for startup ventures, and has already had some success with the Musicion Project, a cryptocurrency and beta music streaming and sharing platform. Musiconomi builds on this Blockchain platform using smart contracts in order to distribute music and provide payment to artists each....


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