Online Thief Steals Amazon Account to Mine Litecoins in the Cloud

Online Thief Steals Amazon Account to Mine Litecoins in the Cloud

Why bother installing CPU-mining malware on thousands of machines, when you can just break into someone's Amazon cloud computing account and create a well-managed datacentre instead? This week, a software developer discovered someone had done just that, and made off with a pile of litecoins on his dime. Melbourne-based programmer Luke Chadwick got a nasty shock after receiving an email from Amazon. The firm told him that his Amazon Key (a security credential used to log on to Amazon Web services) had been found on one of his Github repositories. Github repositories. Github is an online....


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Quotes

Back in 1994 when Amazon was just getting started the bricks-and -mortar merchants were asked how they would respond to Amazon. They were asked "What’s your Internet strategy?" And their collective response was along the lines of ... "Our what?" It’s 2012. The question now is ... "What’s your Bitcoin strategy?"

Stephen Gornick